SAWS: No-Fail Fruit Trees for San Antonio
Aquifer Beaker

Edwards Aquifer

Aquifer Level 663.7'
10/18/17 - Official

The Edwards aquifer and its catchment area in the San Antonio region is about 8,000 square miles and includes all or part of 13 counties in south-central Texas.

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Year-Round Watering Hours

Watering with an irrigation system or sprinkler is allowed any day of the week before 11 a.m. or after 7 p.m.

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Aquifer Level 663.7 | Year-Round Watering Hours

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Conservation
No-Fail Fruit Trees for San Antonio
By Calvin R. Finch, Ph.D.
Did you know there's a large assortment of fruit trees you can grow with much success in San Antonio?

Around February, area nurseries will begin receiving shipments of fruit trees for the year. Did you know there's a large assortment of fruit trees you can grow with much success in San Antonio? The key: choosing the right variety.

Some fruit trees such as pears, oriental persimmons, figs, and pomegranates are easy to grow since they do well in our native soils and don't require extensive pesticide spraying to survive and produce a crop. Apples, peaches and plums are another story. They do best in raised garden beds with drip irrigation and must be sprayed every week with an insecticide and fungicide to prosper.

It is best bet is to select fruit trees that are suited for our warm winters. Consider these:

  • For peaches, 'June Gold,' Tex Royal' and 'La Feliciana' do best; 'Elberta' will not survive here.
  • For apples, try 'Dorset Golden' and 'Anna;' forget about 'Red Delicious.'
  • The best pear varieties are 'Warren' and 'Kieffer;' 'Bartlett' pears are highly susceptible to fire blight.
  • The 'Methley' plum is the best choice for San Antonio.

Full sun and good drainage are musts for all fruit trees whether they're grown in native soil or raised beds.

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Calvin R. Finch is the director of regional initiatives and special projects for
San Antonio Water System.

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Super Bird
Commonly found throughout the southwest, Greater Roadrunners are rather weak flyers, but boy can they run! When hunting lizards, snakes and other small birds, roadrunners reach speeds of up to 20 miles an hour. It's no wonder the coyote never caught him.
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